Wired (magazine)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Wired is a full-color monthly American magazine and on-line periodical published since March 1993[1]. Owned by Condé Nast Publications, it reports on how "cyber" and internet technologies affect culture, the economy, and politics. It was "the ultimate geek magazine" and technotopian.

Wired's editorial stance was originally inspired by the ideas of Canadian media theorist Marshall McLuhan, credited as the magazine's "patron saint" in early colophons. Wired has both been admired and disliked for its strong libertarian principles, its enthusiastic embrace of techno-utopianism, and its sometimes experimental layout with its bold use of fluorescent and metallic inks.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Wired (magazine)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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