NC-17  

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The Birth of Venus (detail), a 1486 painting by Sandro Botticelli
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The Birth of Venus (detail), a 1486 painting by Sandro Botticelli

NC-17 is a rating in the film rating system of the United States used for a film suitable for adults, ages 17 and up.

In the early years of the Motion Picture Association of America, the film rating system of the United States, "X"-rated films such as Midnight Cowboy (1969), A Clockwork Orange (1971), the animated Fritz the Cat (1972), and Last Tango in Paris (1973) were understood to be unsuitable for children, but non-pornographic and intended for the general public. However, pornographic films often self-applied the non-trademarked "X" rating, and it soon became synonymous with pornography in American culture. In late 1989 and early 1990, two critically acclaimed art films featuring strong adult content, Henry: Portrait of a Serial Killer and The Cook, the Thief, His Wife & Her Lover, were released. Neither was approved for an MPAA rating, thus limiting their commercial distribution, and prompting criticism of the rating system's lack of a designation for such films. In September 1990, the MPAA introduced the rating "NC-17" ("No Children Under 17 Admitted"). Henry & June – previously to be assigned an "X" rating – was the first film to receive the "NC-17" rating instead. Although films with an "NC17" rating had more mainstream distribution opportunities than "X"-rated films, many cinemas refused to screen them, most entertainment media did not accept advertising for them, and many large video outlets refused to stock them.

Contents

List

This is a list of films rated NC-17 by the Motion Picture Association of America's. It includes X-rated films reassigned an NC-17 rating, and titles originally rated NC-17, but edited for a lower rating. Titles with surrendered ratings are usually released unrated to avoid the stigma of NC-17.

Changes in ratings are due to resubmission or appeal by a film's producers. Films receiving an NC-17 are often cut and resubmitted in hopes of earning an R rating, which allows distribution to more outlets than an NC-17 rating.

Occasionally an R-rated film will have footage added to earn an NC-17 rating and its accompanying notoriety. In at least one case, an R-rated film was re-rated NC-17 even though no edits were made: The 1969 Sam Peckinpah film The Wild Bunch, originally rated R, was resubmitted by Warner Bros. in 1993 before an expected rerelease; to their surprise, it was rated NC-17, delaying the rerelease while the decision was appealed.

Some titles include the reasons the rating was given. In 1990, CARA began including a brief statement of the reason for a specific film's R rating; several years later it began giving reasons for all film ratings.

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  • 1900, 1976, originally rated X; edited version rated R (1977); uncut version rated NC-17 (1990), rating surrendered.

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See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "NC-17" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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