Pink Flamingos  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Pink Flamingos is a 1972 black comedy film directed by John Waters. When the film was initially released in 1972, it caused a huge degree of controversy and thus, it has became one of the most notorious cult films ever made. It made an underground star of the flamboyant female impersonator, Divine. The independent film also stars David Lochary, Mary Vivian Pearce, Mink Stole, Danny Mills, Cookie Mueller, Edith Massey and Steve Yeager. Produced on a budget of only $12,000, it was shot on weekends in the vicinity of Baltimore, Maryland. The majority of the film was shot in Phoenix, Maryland, a suburb of Baltimore.

Since its release it has had a rather large cult following and is one of John Waters' most famous or downright notorious films due to some shocking scenes and the wide range of perverse, taboo acts performed in the film. In 1997, the film was re-released, with an improved stereo soundtrack (which, unlike the original, was made available to the general public, on compact disc), and after the end of the original movie the new version contained a brief video commentary by Waters, plus a few scenes cut from the original release. The re-release was rated NC-17 by the Motion Picture Association of America. It was later subjected to a DVD release.

The film came in at number 29 on the list of 50 Films to See Before You Die, on a show in the United Kingdom.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Pink Flamingos" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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