Anti-paganism policies of the early Byzantine Empire  

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The anti-paganism policies of the early Byzantine Empire ranged from 395 till 476. Anti-paganism laws were enacted by the Byzantine Emperors Arcadius, and Leo I the Thracian. They reiterated previous legal bans, especially on pagan religious rites and sacrifices and increased the penalties for their practice. The pagan religions had still many followers but they were increasingly obliged to keep under cover to formally comply with the edicts.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Anti-paganism policies of the early Byzantine Empire" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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