User:Jahsonic/Religions of hardship and religions of plenty  

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Rice terrace in The Philippines, an example of abundance
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Rice terrace in The Philippines, an example of abundance

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Western religion is one of the hardship and austerity of the harsh desert climate, while Eastern religion is one of abundance of lush forests and valleys.

Take this painting Christ in the Desert[1] depicting Christ in a desolate landscape. It is clear that such an arid climate, where a day spent without looking for food or water is a risk for your life (see human life in deserts), will lead to a religion that is unforgiving. That is why the Abrahamic religions are sometimes called desert monotheism. Paradoxically, the Garden of Eden was a land of plenty, as depicted here in The Fall of Man[2] by Lucas Cranach.

Eastern religion developed in the land of plenty, where the natural environment and vegetation was plentiful, so its religions are geared far less towards punishment.

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