Polyolbiosis  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Polyolbiosis (translated literally as polyvalent beatitude or polyvalent blessedness) is a word coined by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, recorded in his notebooks.

The English scholar Alistair Ian Blyth remarks that the term is a:

"compound dream word that coalesced during laudanum reverie, a hapax legomenon unique to Coleridge: "state of polyvalent beatitude" (ὄλβιος, ον happy, blessed, -ωσις suffix forming nouns of process or condition)".[1]

Alethea Hayter and others have claimed this word is the equivalent of Thomas De Quincey's 'involute'.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Polyolbiosis" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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