Phenomenon  

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Citation: "energy destroys us; it is we who pay the price of the inevitable explosion" --The Accursed Share, cited in Logics of Failed Revolt: French Theory After May '68 by Peter Starr
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Citation: "energy destroys us; it is we who pay the price of the inevitable explosion" --The Accursed Share, cited in Logics of Failed Revolt: French Theory After May '68 by Peter Starr
 This page Phenomenon is part of the supernatural series Illustration: Henri Robin and a Specter, 1863 by Eugène Thiébault
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This page Phenomenon is part of the supernatural series
Illustration: Henri Robin and a Specter, 1863 by Eugène Thiébault

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

A phenomenon (Greek: φαινόμενoν, pl. phenomena φαινόμενα) is any occurrence that is observable.

Contents

Use in physics

In physics phenomena are the subject of all observation. A phenomenon may be a feature of matter, energy, or spacetime. For example, Isaac Newton made observations of the phenomenon of the moon's orbit. Additionally, Galileo Galilei made observations of pendulum related phenomena.

Use in philosophy

In philosophy, the use of the word phenomenon differs from other uses in that it refers to perceived events. Phenomena may be perceived through a person's senses or with their mind.

Group and social

social phenomenon

Group phenomena concern the behavior of a particular group of individual entities, usually organisms and most especially people. The behavior of individuals often changes in a group setting in various ways, and a group may have its own behaviors not possible for an individual because of the herd mentality.

Social phenomena apply especially to organisms and people in that subjective states are implicit in the term. Attitudes and events particular to a group may have effects beyond the group, and either be adapted by the larger society, or seen as aberrant, being punished or shunned.

Etymology

From Late Latin phaenomenon ‎(“appearance”), from Ancient Greek φαινόμενον ‎(phainómenon, “thing appearing to view”), neuter present passive participle of φαίνω ‎(phaínō, “I show”).

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Phenomenon" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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