Art punk  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Art Punk is a term given to punk rock music which may infuse avant-garde elements or which focuses on being more original and challenging as an art form. After punk's rise in and around 1977, many groups struggled with the directions of the new musical style. Some groups were formed with extremely populist ideology; many of these groups believed punk should be simple and often wrote three-chord songs, presumably with the intention that anyone should be able to play this music. Some examples of bands formed under these or similar principles include The Clash, Sham 69 and Sex Pistols. At roughly the same time, many punk groups were evolving to include more complex song structures and varied instruments, such as the synthesizer. Some of these groups include Wire, Talking Heads, and Suicide. Most of the original art punk bands are often classified as post-punk, despite the fact that bands like Suicide and Television existed before even the Ramones. The influence of these bands extends beyond the boundary of punk music.

Art Punk Bands




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Art punk" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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