Atra-Hasis  

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In 1965 W. G. Lambert and [[Alan Millard|A. R. Millard]] traces the model drawn from Atrahasis to a corresponding passage, the division by lots of the air, underworld and sea among Zeus, Hades and Poseidon in the ''[[Iliad]]'', in which “a resetting through which the foreign framework still shows”. In 1965 W. G. Lambert and [[Alan Millard|A. R. Millard]] traces the model drawn from Atrahasis to a corresponding passage, the division by lots of the air, underworld and sea among Zeus, Hades and Poseidon in the ''[[Iliad]]'', in which “a resetting through which the foreign framework still shows”.
-In its most complete surviving version, the Atrahasis epic is written on three tablets in [[Akkadian]], the language of ancient Babylon.<ref>Lambert and Millard, pages 8–15</ref>+In its most complete surviving version, the Atrahasis epic is written on three tablets in [[Akkadian]], the language of ancient Babylon.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.


The 18th century BCE Akkadian epic of Atra-Hasis is named after its protagonist. An “Atra-Hasis” (“exceedingly wise”) appears on one of the Sumerian king lists as king of Shuruppak in the times before the flood. Stephanie Dalley mentions the similarity of the name Atra-Hasis to that of Prometheus (“Forethinker”), father of the Greek Deluge hero Deucalion. The Atra-Hasis tablets include both a creation myth and a flood account, which is one of three surviving Babylonian deluge stories. The oldest known copy of the epic tradition concerning Atrahasis can be dated by colophon (scribal identification) to the reign of Hammurabi’s great-grandson, Ammi-Saduqa (1646–1626 BCE), but various Old Babylonian fragments exist; it continued to be copied into the first millennium BCE. The Atrahasis story also exists in a later fragmentary Assyrian version, having been first rediscovered in the library of Ashurbanipal, but, because of the fragmentary condition of the tablets and ambiguous words, translations had been uncertain. Its fragments were assembled and translated first by George Smith as The Chaldean Account of Genesis; the name of its hero was corrected to Atra-Hasis by Heinrich Zimmern in 1899.

In 1965 W. G. Lambert and A. R. Millard traces the model drawn from Atrahasis to a corresponding passage, the division by lots of the air, underworld and sea among Zeus, Hades and Poseidon in the Iliad, in which “a resetting through which the foreign framework still shows”.

In its most complete surviving version, the Atrahasis epic is written on three tablets in Akkadian, the language of ancient Babylon.


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