Deucalion  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

In Greek mythology, Deucalion (Template:Lang-grc) was a son of Prometheus and Pronoia. When the anger of Zeus was ignited against the hubris of the Pelasgians, Zeus decided to put an end to the Bronze Age with the Deluge. For Lycaon, the king of Arcadia had sacrificed a boy to Zeus. Zeus was appalled at this cannibal offering and others like that. So Zeus set upon loosing a deluge, where the rivers would run in torrents and the sea encroach rapidly on the coastal plain, engulf the foothills with spray, and wash everything clean. Deucalion was then saved from this deluge, by the aid of his father Prometheus, like his Biblical analogue Noah and the Mesopotamian counterpart Utnapishtim by building an ark.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Deucalion" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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