Zelda Fitzgerald  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Zelda Sayre Fitzgerald (July 24, 1900 - March 10, 1948), born Zelda Sayre in Montgomery, Alabama, was the wife of writer F. Scott Fitzgerald, whom she married in 1920. She published an autobiographical novel, Save Me the Waltz, in 1932. Considered by many of her era to embody the quintessential flapper, Fitzgerald gained notoriety as much for her own exploits as for her role in inspiring many of her husband's most famous characters, especially Nicole Diver of Tender Is the Night.
Image:Zeldaportrait.jpg
Zelda Sayre in 1919

In June 1930 she suffered her first mental breakdown; soon afterwards, she was diagnosed with schizophrenia and was required to live from then on in a mental hospital. She died at the age of 47 in a fire at the Highland Mental Hospital in Asheville, North Carolina. Eight other patients were also killed.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Zelda Fitzgerald" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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