Yve-Alain Bois  

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Yve-Alain Bois (born 1952) is an historian and critic of modern art. Yve-Alain Bois was born on April 16, 1952 in Constantine, Algeria. He is an editor of the journal October.

Academic Activities

In a formative early experience, he rejected Michel Seuphor's mis-characterization of Piet Mondrian as a kind of neo-Platonic monk, upon receiving this book as a confirmation present from his grandfather. He received an M.A. from the Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes in Paris for work on El Lissitzky's typography, and a Ph.D. from the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales for work on Lissitzky's and Malevich's conceptions of space. His advisor was Roland Barthes.

He is Professor in the School of Historical Studies at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton, New Jersey, in the chair inaugurated by Erwin Panofsky. Previously, he served on the faculty at Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, and the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique.

He has written books or major articles on canonical artists of European modernism including Henri Matisse, Pablo Picasso, Piet Mondrian, El Lissitzky, Kazimir Malevich, Sophie Taeuber-Arp, and of American postwar art including Barnett Newman, Ad Reinhardt, Cy Twombly, Ellsworth Kelly, Richard Serra, and Robert Ryman. He is also an influential interpreter of comparatively more obscure artists including Wladyslaw Strzeminski, Katarzyna Kobro, and Sophie Calle.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Yve-Alain Bois" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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