Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers (better known as the Stationers' Company) is one of the Livery Companies of the City of London. The Stationers' Company was founded in 1403; it received a Royal Charter in 1557. It held a monopoly over the publishing industry and was officially responsible for setting and enforcing copyright regulations until the passage of the Statute of Anne in 1709.

Its members are all involved with the modern visual and graphic communications industries that have evolved from the original trades of the Company. These include printing, papermaking, packaging, office products, engineering, advertising, design, photography , film and video production, publishing of books, newspapers and periodicals and digital media. Its principal modern purpose is to provide an independent forum in which its members can advance the interests (strategic, educational, training and charitable) of the industries served by the Company.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Worshipful Company of Stationers and Newspaper Makers" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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