Workers of the world, unite!  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The political slogan Workers of the world, unite!, is one of the most famous rallying cries of communism, found in The Communist Manifesto (1848), by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels. A variant form, Proletarians of all lands, unite! is inscribed to Marx's tombstone in German: Proletarier aller Länder, vereinigt euch!

This slogan was the USSR State motto (Пролетарии всех стран, соединяйтесь!), appeared in the coat of arms of the Soviet Union, and on 1919 Russian SFSR banknotes (in German, French, Chinese, English, and Arabic). Contemporarily, some socialist and communist parties continue using it. Moreover, it is a common usage in popular culture, often chanted during labour strikes and protests.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Workers of the world, unite!" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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