Women in piracy  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

While piracy was predominantly a male activity or occupation, a significant minority of historical pirates have been female. Female pirates, like other women in crime, faced unique issues in practicing this occupation and in punishment for it.

Contents

Historical female pirates

Female pirates whose existence is disputed

Female pirates in fiction

While most fictional and dramatic depictions of pirates have been male, some notable female pirates have been depicted.

See:

See generally:

References

  • David Cordingly, Seafaring Women: Adventures of Pirate Queens, Female Stowaways, and Sailors' Wives
  • John Druett, She Captains: Heroines and Hellions of the Sea. Simon & Schuster, 2000.
  • Sara Lorimer, Booty: Girl Pirates on the High Seas. Chronicle Books, 2002.
  • James L. Nelson, The Only Life That Mattered
  • Sandra Riley, Sisters of the Sea
  • Jo Stanley, Bold in Her Breeches

See also





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Women in piracy" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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