Women in Love (film)  

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Women in Love is a 1969 British film which tells the story of the relationships between men and women during the early part of the 20th century. It stars Alan Bates, Oliver Reed, Glenda Jackson and Jennie Linden. The film was adapted from the novel Women in Love by D.H. Lawrence. It was directed by Ken Russell and is famous for an extended scene in which Alan Bates and Oliver Reed wrestle in the nude.

Trivia

Both Oliver Reed and Alan Bates were initially apprehensive about filming the legendary nude wrestling scene. Russell had to assure them that the set would be off-limits and that there would be no rehearsal. Both actors got reasonably drunk before shooting, but the scene became memorable.

Considered, along with Haskell Wexler's Medium Cool (1969), to be among the first mainstream movies to feature male frontal nudity.

Glenda Jackson was the first actress to win an Oscar for a role in which there was a nude scene.

Michael Gough was cast after shooting had begun when it was decided that the actor first cast in the part was miscast.

Michael Caine turned down the role of Gerald.

Jennie Linden had just given birth to her first child when she was cast, whereas Glenda Jackson fell pregnant during preproduction and at the latter part of the shoot, the camera had to work around her bulge. However, Russell found it advantageous, as it gave her fuller, firmer breasts, that were an asset to the allure of her character.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Women in Love (film)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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