We are the 99%  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

We are the 99% is a political slogan widely used and coined by the Occupy movement. It was the name of a Tumblr blog page launched in late August 2011 and is a variation on the phrase "We The 99%" from an August 2011 flyer for the NYC General Assembly. A related statistic, the 1%, refers to the top 1% wealthiest people in society that have a disproportionate share of capital, political influence, and the means of production.

The phrase directly refers to the income and wealth inequality in the United States with a concentration of wealth among the top earning 1%. It reflects an opinion that the "99%" are paying the price for the mistakes of a tiny minority within the upper class. Template:As of, all households with incomes less than $343,927 belonged to the lower 99% of the United States' income distribution, according to IRS reports. The concept has been criticized as being a century old, and wealth concentration been defended as correlating with the health of the stock market. The slogan has also been used in other countries, not just the US.

Beginning in 2015, the related statistic of the 1% was used often in Bernie Sanders's presidential campaign. He would use phrases such as, "Now is the time to create a government which represents all Americans and not just the 1%," and it became a key identifier of his message, often repeated on late-night talk shows and the like.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "We are the 99%" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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