Vulval vestibule  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Vulval vestibule (or "Vulvar vestibule") is a part of the vulva between the labia minora into which the urethral opening and the vaginal opening open. Its edge is marked by Hart's Line.

The external urethral orifice (orificium urethræ externum; urinary meatus) is placed about 2.5 cm behind the glans clitoridis and immediately in front of that of the vagina; it usually assumes the form of a short, sagittal cleft with slightly raised margins. Nearby are the openings of the Skene's ducts.

The vaginal orifice is a median slit below and behind the opening of the urethra; its size varies inversely with that of the hymen.

Pathology

The prevalence of pain at the vulvar vestibule is relatively common. A study by the University of Michigan found that about 28% of women have experienced vulvar vestibular pain in the past, and about 8% had the pain in the last 6 months.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Vulval vestibule" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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