Video cover artwork  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Video cover artwork[1] was graphic design destined for VHS and Betamax video cassettes. It has been replaced by DVD artwork.

In the words of Killer Covers[2], a site dedicated to the subject.

"In the early 1980’s video recorders rapidly became a standard household item. A new form of mass entertainment was readily available in the form of the (then) unregulated videocassette tape. The most popular films, apart from pornography, were low budget horror films, many of which were to become known as Video Nasties. There has been a great deal written about the Video Nasties issue from the point of view of censorship, but very little about the artwork used in the promotion of these videos. The lifespan of this style of artwork lasted only a few years before government regulation took effect; indeed part of the appeal of the Video Nasties phenomenon lies in the ephemeral nature of these videos and their covers. --Paul Flanagan via http://www.contamination.pwp.blueyonder.co.uk/articles/grindhouse_aesthetics.htm [Feb 2005]

Famous covers

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Video cover artwork" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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