User:Jahsonic/dark fin de siècle fascination with human female/ape contact  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

A number of fin de siècle artworks betray a fascination with human female/non-human primate contact.

The first works in this category are Emmanuel Frémiet's sculptures Gorilla Carrying off a Woman (1887) and An Orang Outan Strangling a Young Borneo Savage (1895).

Then, in 1902, there is Hostile Forces, a detail of the Beethoven Frieze by Gustav Klimt.

Alfred Kubin produced at least three works in this category: Lubricity (1902), One Woman For All[1] (1900-01) and The Ape (1903-1906).

Later appearances in literature and film

See also




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