Ubiquity  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The state or quality of being, or appearing to be, everywhere at once; actual or perceived omnipresence.

"the repetitiveness, the selfsameness, and the ubiquity of modern mass culture" (Theodor Adorno)


The conquest of ubiquity

"Just as water, gas, and electricity are brought into our houses from far off to satisfy our needs in response to a minimal effort, so we shall be supplied with visual or auditory images, which will appear and disappear at a simple movement of the hand, hardly more than a sign."-- Paul Valéry, “ La conquête de l’ubiquité ” (1928), Pièces sur l'Art
"Comme l'eau, comme le gaz, comme le courant électrique viennent de loin dans nos demeures répondre à nos besoins moyennant un effort quasi nul, ainsi serons-nous alimentés d'images visuelles ou auditives, naissant et s'évanouissant au moindre geste, presque à un signe. -- Paul Valéry, “ La conquête de l’ubiquité ” (1928), Pièces sur l'Art


Ubiquitous music

[W]hat I call ubiquitous musics: music in films, in stores, on the phone, in the office, on television, in audio books, and so on. These are the kinds of music that no one chooses for themselves but nevertheless wash our everyday lives with sound. While this is the music that we hear the most of per capita, it is not routinely included in popular music studies. I want to suggest that its absence has a lot to do with the way we define popular. --Thomas Swiss


Antonyms




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Ubiquity" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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