Travel journal  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
travel literature

A travel journal, or road journal or travelogue , is an initially blank book carried by a traveler for the purpose of documenting a journey. Clippings, tokens, or tickets may be included as they are collected. The journal may also include notes written by acquaintances. Some journals feature hand-drawn illustrations, or even watercolors, of friends and places. A travelogue may also contain details of bad experiences. Since the popularization of the World Wide Web, digital travel journals called travel blogs have become commonplace.

In popular culture

Jack Kerouac's On the Road is a stream of consciousness novel written largely as a travel journal based on the spontaneous road trips of Kerouac and his friends across mid-century America. Jonathan Swift's 1726 Gulliver's Travels is a satirical novel parodying the "travellers' tales" literary sub-genre that was immensely popular at that time. Geoffrey Chaucer's 14th century The Canterbury Tales, mostly a collection of unrelated stories, is interspersed with details of a group pilgrimage from Southwark to Canterbury.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Travel journal" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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