Tom Wolfe  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Thomas Kennerly Wolfe Jr. (March 2, 1930 – May 14, 2018) was an American author and journalist widely known for his association with New Journalism, a style of news writing and journalism developed in the 1960s and 1970s that incorporated literary techniques.

Wolfe began his career as a regional newspaper reporter in the 1950s, achieving national prominence in the 1960s following the publication of such best-selling books as The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test (a highly experimental account of Ken Kesey and the Merry Pranksters) and two collections of articles and essays, Radical Chic & Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers and The Kandy-Kolored Tangerine-Flake Streamline Baby. In 1979, he published the influential book The Right Stuff about the Mercury Seven astronauts, which was made into a 1983 film of the same name directed by Philip Kaufman.

His first fiction novel, The Bonfire of the Vanities, published in 1987, was met with critical acclaim and also became a commercial success. It was adapted as a major motion picture of the same name directed by Brian De Palma.

Contents

Bibliography

Non-fiction

Novels

Featured in

Notable articles

  • "The Last American Hero Is Junior Johnson. Yes!" Esquire, March 1965.
  • "Tiny Mummies! The True Story of the Ruler of 43rd Street's Land of the Walking Dead!" New York Herald-Tribune supplement (April 11, 1965).
  • "Lost in the Whichy Thicket," New York Herald-Tribune supplement (April 18, 1965).
  • "The Birth of the New Journalism: Eyewitness Report by Tom Wolfe." New York, February 14, 1972.
  • "The New Journalism: A la Recherche des Whichy Thickets." New York Magazine, February 21, 1972.
  • "Why They Aren't Writing the Great American Novel Anymore." Esquire, December 1972.
  • "The Me Decade and the Third Great Awakening" New York, August 23, 1976.
  • "Stalking the Billion-Footed Beast", Harper's. November 1989.
  • "Sorry, but Your Soul Just Died." Forbes 1996.
  • "Pell Mell." The Atlantic Monthly (November 2007).
  • "The Rich Have Feelings, Too." Vanity Fair (September 2009).

See also





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Tom Wolfe" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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