Where no man has gone before  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

"Where no man has gone before" is a phrase originally made popular through its use in the title sequence of most episodes of the original Star Trek science fiction television series. It refers to the mission of the original starship Enterprise. The complete introductory sequence, narrated by William Shatner at the beginning of every episode of Star Trek except "The Cage" (which preceded Shatner's involvement with the show) and "Where No Man Has Gone Before", is:

Space: the final frontier. These are the voyages of the starship Enterprise. Its five-year mission: to explore strange new worlds, to seek out new life and new civilizations, to boldly go where no man has gone before.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Where no man has gone before" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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