Thick  

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 True portrait of Monsieur Ubu (1896) is a woodcut frontispiece for Ubu Roi. It represents Ubu, a fictional character from Jarry's eponymous play.
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True portrait of Monsieur Ubu (1896) is a woodcut frontispiece for Ubu Roi. It represents Ubu, a fictional character from Jarry's eponymous play.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Thick is the opposite of thin. It may refer to:

  • thick concept, a concept that is both descriptive and evaluative.
  • thick description, a description that explains a behaviour along with its broader context.

Etymology

From Middle English thicke, from Old English þicce (“thick, dense”), from Proto-Germanic *þikkuz, *þikkwiz (“thick”), from Proto-Indo-European *tegus (“thick”). Cognate with Dutch dik (“thick”), German dick (“thick”), Swedish tjock (“thick”), Albanian thuk (“I press, thicken, make dense”), Old Irish tiug (“thick”) and Welsh tew (“thick”).

Disambiguation

  1. Relatively great in extent from one surface to the opposite in its smallest solid dimension.
  2. Measuring a certain number of units in this dimension.
    I want some planks that are two inches thick.
  3. Heavy in build; thickset.
    He had such a thick neck that he had to turn his body to look to the side.
  4. Densely crowded or packed.
    We walked through thick undergrowth.
  5. Having a viscous consistency.
    My mum’s gravy was thick but at least it moved about.
  6. Abounding in number.
    The room was thick with reporters.
  7. Impenetrable to sight.
    We drove through thick fog.
  8. Difficult to understand, or poorly articulated.
    We had difficulty understanding him with his thick accent.
  9. Stupid.
    He was as thick as two short planks.
  10. Friendly or intimate.
    They were as thick as thieves.
  11. Deep, intense, or profound.
    Thick darkness.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Thick" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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