The life of man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of an oyster  

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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
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Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

"The life of man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of an oyster" is a dictum by David Hume from his posthumously published text on suicide.

"In order to destroy the evidence of this conclusion, we must shew a reason, why this particular case is excepted. Is it because human life is of so great importance, that it is a presumption for human prudence to dispose of it? But the life of a man is of no greater importance to the universe than that of an oyster) And were it of ever so great importance, the order of nature has actually submitted it to human prudence, and reduced us to a necessity in every incident of determining concerning it."

It resembles the dictum "La vie du plus sublime des hommes n'est pas à la nature d'une plus grande importance que celle d'une huître" by Marquis de Sade.



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