The freest spirit that has yet existed  

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 This page The freest spirit that has yet existed is part of the Marquis de Sade series  Illustration: Portrait fantaisiste du marquis de Sade (1866) by H. Biberstein
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This page The freest spirit that has yet existed is part of the Marquis de Sade series
Illustration: Portrait fantaisiste du marquis de Sade (1866) by H. Biberstein

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

"The freest spirit that has yet existed (French: "cet esprit le plus libre qui ait encore existé") is an epithet given by Guillaume Apollinaire to French writer Marquis de Sade, first recorded in L'œuvre du Marquis de Sade (1909).

The full passage reads:

"Le marquis de Sade, cet esprit le plus libre qui ait encore existé, avait sur la femme des idées particulières et la voulait aussi libre que l'homme. Ces idées, que l'on dégagera quelque jour, ont donné naissance à un double roman: Justine et Juliette. Ce n'est pas au hasard que le marquis a choisi des héroïnes et non pas des héros."




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The freest spirit that has yet existed" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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