The Savoy (periodical)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Savoy[1] [2] [3] was a magazine of literature, art, and criticism published during the year 1896 in London. It featured work by authors such as W. B. Yeats, Joseph Conrad, and Aubrey Beardsley.

Only eight issues of the magazine were published. The publisher was Leonard Smithers, a controversial friend of Oscar Wilde who was known as a pornographer. Among other publications by Smithers were rare erotic works and unique items such as books bound in human skin.

The magazine was started by Smithers, writer Arthur Symons (The Symbolist Movement In Literature) and artist Aubrey Beardsley. It is considered a little magazine, and was described as "a manifesto in revolt against Victorian materialism".

Symons attempted to distance the magazine from the "decadent" and imprisoned Oscar Wilde by writing, "We are not Realists, or Romanticists, or Decadents" in his editorial note in the first issue. However, he went on to write, "For us, all art is good which is good art," which is very similar to the Decadent creed of "art for art's sake."

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Savoy (periodical)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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