The Painting of Modern Life: Paris in the Art of Manet and his Followers  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Painting of Modern Life: Paris in the Art of Manet and his Followers (1985) is a book by T. J. Clark. The title is based on the essay by Baudelaire "The Painter of Modern Life".

Product description:

The Paris of the 1860s and 1870s was supposedly a brand new city, equipped with boulevards, cafes, parks and suburban pleasure grounds - the birthplace of those habits of commerce that constitute "modern life". Questioning those who view Impressionism solely in terms of artistic technique, T.J. Clark describes the painting of Manet, Degas, Seurat and others as an attempt to give form to that modernity and seek out its typical representatives - be they barmaids, boaters, prostitutes, sightseers or petits bourgeois lunching on the grass. The central question of the book is this: did modern painting as it came into being celebrate the consumer-oriented culture of the Paris of Napoleon III, or open it to critical scrutiny?

Excerpts

"the perfect heroes and heroines of [the] myth of modernity were the petite-bourgeoisie"

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Painting of Modern Life: Paris in the Art of Manet and his Followers" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools