The Flirts  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Flirts were a female trio from New York who had several dance hits and music videos on MTV in the early eighties when the channel was still in its infancy. The trio - initially Andrea, Holly and Rebecca - are best known for releasing quirky and/or sensual New Wave, Hi-NRG and Dance-pop tunes, one of which was their 1982 hit "Jukebox (Don't Put Another Dime)" from their debut album 10¢ a Dance. The single received heavy airplay on MTV and has appeared on several 80's new wave compilation albums. Their singles still get airplay by some College radio stations. The group was created and masterminded by American Hi-NRG producer, Bobby Orlando aka 'Bobby O', an artist in his own right.

In 1983-1984 The Flirts toured Europe.

After the moderate success of "Jukebox (Don't Put Another Dime)", the single "Passion" off the same album as "Jukebox" began to receive some attention in dance clubs. Other singles followed but didn't quite match the success of the previous two hits. The Flirts also went through numerous lineup changes; with almost every album release, some girls left the group while others stayed. Below is a listing of their albums.

Contents

Discography

Albums

Singles

  • "Jukebox (Don't Put Another Dime)"
  • "Passion"
  • "Calling All Boys"
  • "Jungle Rock"
  • "We Just Want to Dance"
  • "On the Beach"
  • "Miss You"
  • "Boy Crazy"
  • "Helpless (You Took My Love)"
  • "Dancing Madly Backwards"
  • "Danger"
  • "You and Me"
  • "New Toy"
  • "Oriental Boy"
  • "After Midnight"
  • "All You Ever Think About Is (Sex)"

The Flirts' biggest chart success in America is with "You & Me", which hit number one on the Hot Dance Club Play chart in 1985, helped along by an early Shep Pettibone club mix. Another one of their popular dance tracks is "Oriental Boy", noted for its blatant politically incorrect stereotyping of Asians-in the song, the singer is in love with an Asian man who ultimately leaves her despite her pleading.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Flirts" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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