The Flesh Eaters (film)  

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The Flesh Eaters is a 1964 American horror/science fiction thriller, directed on a low budget by Jack Curtis and edited by future filmmaker Radley Metzger. The film contains moments of violence much more graphic and extreme than many other movies of its time, making it one of the first ever gore films.

Plot

An over-the-hill actress (Rita Morely) hires a pilot (Byron Sanders) to fly her and her assistant (Barbara Walken) to Providence, but a storm forces them to land on a small island. They very quickly meet a marine biologist (Martin Kosleck, the only “name” in the cast) who is living in seclusion on the isle. He is a former Nazi scientist performing forbidden experiments that have resulted in the production of monstrous “flesh eaters” that can devour the skin off of screaming victims in mere seconds. A beatnik (Ray Tudor) joins up with the group after becoming shipwrecked on the shore. Tensions mount after the plane drifts off into the ocean, leaving the castaways and the mad scientist as potential meals for the ravenous monsters.

The film has developed a cult following due to its gruesome, if primitive, special effects, including some memorably bloody death scenes. One character is eaten from the inside out by the titular monsters, resulting in a gushing fountain of intestinal matter. Another victim is stabbed with a wooden stake, then shot twice in the face, with resultant gaping bullet holes. These scenes, as well as some occasional unintentionally campy moments, have helped to make the film a favorite for late night TV fanatics for decades.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Flesh Eaters (film)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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