The Edenic Serpent as Lilith in Christian Art?  

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The Birth of Venus (detail), a 1486 painting by Sandro Botticelli
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The Birth of Venus (detail), a 1486 painting by Sandro Botticelli

The Edenic Serpent as Lilith in Christian Art?

"There are a couple of images on the Lilith Wikipedia page[1] that unambiguously identify a female serpent with Lilith. The identification of the serpent as Lilith in the Michelangelo[2] and Notre Dame images[3] (and perhaps others on this page?) is a mistake. The Edenic serpent, in the Christian tradition, is identified with Satan. The serpent is often depicted with female attributes to point up its seductiveness and its association with Eve. To identify such depictions as Lilith is a misinterpretation. I notice that Alan Humm, in his webpage that is cited as support in the Lilith article, advances the association between the iconography of the serpent with Lilith tentatively and speculatively, and says that he knows of no textual basis for the identification. The question, as they say, is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. JEM."—Preceding unsigned comment added by 24.41.28.120 (talk) 07:53, 16 February 2010 (UTC)[4]

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