The Decline of American Power  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

"We tend to think and to speak of Christianity as the "West" and Islam as the "East." ... Why? ... We have had some answers recently that are well known to you. Samuel Huntington sees the West and Islam as two antithetical "civilizations" that are in long term political conflict. Edward Said sees Orientalism as a false construct erected for ideological reasons by the Western world, one both pervasive and pernicious in its effect. I prefer to approach the question another way and ask the question, why is it that the Christian world seems to have singled out the Islamic world as its particular demon, and not merely recently but ever since the emergence of Islam? Actually the reverse has probably also been true, that Islam has regarded Christianity as its particular demon."--The Decline of American Power (2003) by Immanuel Wallerstein

"Can the West do without a demon? I doubt it at the moment. The West is facing a massive crisis ... This same confusion and self-doubt pervades the Islamic world."--The Decline of American Power (2003) by Immanuel Wallerstein

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Decline of American Power (2003) is a book by Immanuel Wallerstein

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Decline of American Power" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools