The Day of the Dolphin (book)  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

The Day of the Dolphin (Un animal doué de raison – lit. A Sentient Animal) is a 1967 science fiction thriller novel by French novelist Robert Merle. The plot concerns dolphins that are trained to communicate with humans, and their use in warfare. The central character is a government scientist with similar ideas to those of John C. Lilly.

The English translation of the novel was published in 1969 with the title The Day of the Dolphin, which is not a literal translation of the French title. The novel was the basis for the 1973 film The Day of the Dolphin, though the film's plot was significantly different from that of the book, even in inconsequential details. For instance, in the book, the dolphins are named Ivan ("the terrible") and Bessie and call themselves Fa and Bi; in the film, they are instead named Alpha and Beta and call themselves Fa and Be.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "The Day of the Dolphin (book)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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