Text (literary theory)  

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By virtue of his magnum opus, the posthumous Ethics, Spinoza is considered one of Western philosophy's definitive ethicists.
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By virtue of his magnum opus, the posthumous Ethics, Spinoza is considered one of Western philosophy's definitive ethicists.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
text

A text, within literary theory, is a coherent set of symbols that transmits some kind of informative message. Other ideas related to this have specific meanings within literary theory.

Contents

Authorship

The author of a "text" is defined within literary theory as "A statement, transcribed from the item being described, relating to persons responsible for the intellectual or artistic content of the item".Text can also refer to writing in a book or manuscript. Text formally refers to writing.

History of the text

Since the history of writing predates the concept of the "text", most texts were not written with this concept in mind. Most written works fall within a narrow range of the types described by text theory. The concept of "text" becomes relevant if/when a "coherent written message is completed and needs to be referred to independently of the circumstances in which it was created."

Other media as texts

In Film theory, film is referred to a "text".

Text may also refer to

In books:

In unit of study:

In writing:

See





Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Text (literary theory)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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