Terry Zwigoff  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Terry Zwigoff (born May 18, 1949 in Appleton, Wisconsin) is an American filmmaker based in San Francisco. He became well-known for two popular small budget films, both arising out of the world of underground or alternative comics: the documentary Crumb (1994), about underground comics figure Robert Crumb, and the feature Ghost World (2001), adapted from a story in Dan Clowes's comic of the same name. He won the Sundance Grand Jury Prize for Crumb and was nominated for an Academy Award for the screenplay of Ghost World.

His first film was Louie Bluie (1986), about blues and string band musician Howard Armstrong. In 2003, he directed Bad Santa, starring Billy Bob Thornton. His most recent film is Art School Confidential, based on another story from Dan Clowes's Eightball.

Zwigoff's association with comics began in the 1970s when he moved to San Francisco and met Robert Crumb, who shared his interest in collecting pre-war American roots music. At age 22, he learned to play the cello and mandolin and joined Crumb's string band, R. Crumb & His Cheap Suit Serenaders. He is currently a member of the San Francisco instrumental trio, The Excitement Boys.

Filmography




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Terry Zwigoff" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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