Telephone  

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Loisirs Littéraires au XXe siècle (English: "Literary leasures in the 20th century"), an illustration from the story "The End of Books" by French writer Octave Uzanne and illustrator Albert Robida.
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Loisirs Littéraires au XXe siècle (English: "Literary leasures in the 20th century"), an illustration from the story "The End of Books" by French writer Octave Uzanne and illustrator Albert Robida.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

A telephone, or phone, is a telecommunications device that permits two or more users to conduct a conversation when they are not in the same vicinity of each other to be heard directly. A telephone converts sound, typically and most efficiently the human voice, into electronic signals suitable for transmission via cables or other transmission media over long distances, and replays such signals simultaneously in audible form to its user. The word telephone has been adapted into the vocabulary of many languages. It is derived from the Greek τῆλε, tēle, far and φωνή, phōnē, voice, together meaning distant voice.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Telephone" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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