Sulfuric acid  

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Image:Rembrandt's painting Danae.jpg
Danae (1636) by Rembrandt
Although Saskia was the original model, Rembrandt later changed the face to that of Geertje. In 1985 the painting was severely damaged, especially near the legs, when a lunatic threw sulphuric acid at it. It took the Hermitage twelve years to restore it.

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Sulfuric acid, (or sulphuric acid in British English) , is a strong mineral acid. It is soluble in water at all concentrations. Sulfuric acid has many applications, and is one of the top products of the chemical industry. World production in 2001 was 165 million tonnes, with an approximate value of US$8 billion. Principal uses include lead-acid batteries for cars and other vehicles, ore processing, fertilizer manufacturing, oil refining, wastewater processing, and chemical synthesis.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Sulfuric acid" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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