Subculture  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
By the late 1960s, revolutionary Che Guevara's famous image had become a popular symbol of youth rebellion
Enlarge
By the late 1960s, revolutionary Che Guevara's famous image had become a popular symbol of youth rebellion
 This page Subculture is part of the publication bias list of the Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia, presented by Alfred Jarry.
Enlarge
This page Subculture is part of the publication bias list of the Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia, presented by Alfred Jarry.
Inversions, the first French gay journal is published between 1924 and 1926, it stopped publication after the French government charged the publishers with "Outrage aux bonnes mœurs".  Its full title was Inversions ... in art, literature, philosophy and science. Sexual inversion was a term used by sexologists in the late 19th and early 20th century, to refer to homosexuality.
Enlarge
Inversions, the first French gay journal is published between 1924 and 1926, it stopped publication after the French government charged the publishers with "Outrage aux bonnes mœurs". Its full title was Inversions ... in art, literature, philosophy and science. Sexual inversion was a term used by sexologists in the late 19th and early 20th century, to refer to homosexuality.

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

In sociology, anthropology and cultural studies, a subculture is a set of people with a set of behaviors and beliefs, culture, which could be distinct or hidden, that differentiate them from the larger culture to which they belong. If the subculture is characterized by a systematic opposition to the dominant culture, then it may be described as a counterculture.

Contents

Definition

As early as 1950 (p.361) David Riesman distinguished between a majority, "which passively accepted commercially provided styles and meanings, and a 'subculture' which actively sought a minority style...and interpreted it in accordance with subversive values" (Middleton 1990).

Sarah Thornton (1995), after Pierre Bourdieu (1986), described subcultural capital as the cultural knowledge and commodities acquired by members of a subculture, raising their status and helping differentiate themselves from members of other groups, while Roe (1990) uses the term symbolic capital.

It is important to mention that there is a subtle difference between a counterculture and a subculture. A subculture is an at least somewhat integrated component of a society, though clearly separated, while a counterculture is actively and openly opposed to many of the characteristics of a society.

Origin of the term

The term subculture began to figure in anthropological and sociological writing around 1945. The concept has been most generally adopted by scholars of delinquency says Pat Rogers in Grub Street: Studies in a Subculture (1972).

Since the late 1970s, the study and concept of subculture - through the influence of the CCCS - has largely been focused on an awareness of style and differences in style, in clothing, music or other cultural areas.

Etymology

1886, in ref. to bacterial cultures, from sub- + culture. 1936 in ref. to humans.

Sources

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Subculture" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools