St Pancras railway station  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

St Pancras railway station is a central London railway terminus located on Euston Road in the London Borough of Camden. It is the terminal station for Eurostar continental services from London to Paris and Brussels via High Speed 1 and the Channel Tunnel.

The station was constructed by the Midland Railway (MR), which had an extensive network across the Midlands and the North of England, but no dedicated line into London. After rail traffic problems following the 1862 International Exhibition, the MR decided to build a connection from Bedford to London with their own terminus. The station was designed by William Henry Barlow and constructed with a single-span iron roof. Following the station's opening on 1 October 1868, the MR constructed the Midland Grand Hotel on the station's facade, which has been widely praised for its architecture and is now a Grade I listed building along with the rest of the station.

By the 1960s, St Pancras was seen as redundant, with services being diverted to King's Cross and Template:Rws, and there was fierce opposition against proposed closures of the station and hotel. It was reinvented in the late 20th century as the terminal of the Channel Tunnel Rail Link as part of an urban regeneration plan across East London. The complex was renovated and expanded from 2001 at a cost of £800 million, reopening on 6 November 2007 by Queen Elizabeth II. A security-sealed terminal area was constructed for Eurostar services to continental Europe via High Speed 1 and the Channel Tunnel, with platforms for domestic trains to the north and south-east of England. The restored station has 15 platforms, a shopping centre, and a coach facility. St Pancras is owned by London and Continental Railways (LCR) and is managed by Network Rail (High Speed), a subsidiary of Network Rail.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "St Pancras railway station" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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