Spoudaiogeloion  

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This page Spoudaiogeloion is part of the foolishness series. Illustration: Ship of Fools  by  Hieronymus Bosch
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This page Spoudaiogeloion is part of the foolishness series.
Illustration: Ship of Fools by Hieronymus Bosch

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Spoudaiogeloion (Greek: σπουδαιογέλοιον) denotes the mixture of serious and comical elements stylistically. The word comes from the Greek σπουδαῖον spoudaion, "serious", and γελοῖον geloion, "comical". The combination first appears in Aristophanes's The Frogs.

Plato made extensive use of this tone in his Gorgias, Euthydemus, Republic, and Laws, and it is thematic in Xenophon's Symposium and the fourth book of his Memorabilia.

The serio-comic style became a rhetorical mainstay of the Cynics, and the Romans gave it its own genre in the form of satire, contributed to most notably by the poets Horace and Juvenal.

Monimus, Menippus and Meleager of Gadara are held to be practitioners of the genre.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Spoudaiogeloion" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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