Splatter film  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
A splatter film or gore film is a type of horror film that deliberately focuses on graphic portrayals of gore and graphic violence. These films, through the use of special effects and excessive blood and guts, tend to display an overt interest in the vulnerability of the human body and the theatricality of its mutilation. Due to their willingness to portray images society might consider shocking, splatter films share some ideological grounds with the transgressive art movement. The term "splatter cinema" was coined by George Romero to describe his film Dawn of the Dead.

Sometimes the gore is so excessive it becomes a comedic device. These types of comedic gore films have been dubbed splatstick (a portmanteau of "splatter" and "slapstick"). A combination of graphic violence and sexually suggestive imagery has at times been labeled "torture porn" or "gorno" (a portmanteau of "gore" and "porno").



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Splatter film" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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