Invisible Insurrection of a Million Minds  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

"Invisible Insurrection of a Million Minds" is a text by Scottish writer Alexander Trocchi first published in the Scottish journal New Saltire Review in 1962 and subsequently as "Technique du coup du monde" in Internationale Situationniste issue # 8 and in English in City Lights Journal No.2, 1963, and as SP2 in the Sigma Portfolio, 1964.

It proposed an international "spontaneous university" as a cultural force and marked the beginning of his movement towards his sigma project, which played a formative part in the UK Underground.

The text starts by quoting Antonin Artaud from The Theatre and Its Double, 1958:

"And if there is still one hellish, truly accursed thing in our time, it is our artistic dallying with forms, instead of being like victims burnt at the stake, signalling through the flames."

The first paragraph:

"REVOLT IS understandably unpopular. As soon as it is defined, it has provoked the measures for its confinement. The prudent man will avoid his definition which is in effect his death-sentence. Besides, it is a limit."

The final paragraph:

"The cultural possibilities of this movement are immense and the time is ripe for it. The world is awfully near the brink of disaster. Scientists, artists, teachers, creative men of goodwill everywhere are in suspense. Waiting. Remembering that it is our kind even now who operate, if they don't control, the grids of expression, we should have no difficulty in recognizing the spontaneous university as the possible detonator of the invisible insurrection."

See also

Full text




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Invisible Insurrection of a Million Minds" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools