Spanish horror  

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Look how solemn they are! from Los Caprichos by Francisco de Goya
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Look how solemn they are! from Los Caprichos by Francisco de Goya

these films possible, both in front of and behind the camera: Jess Franco, Paul Naschy, Amando de Ossorio, Jack Taylor, Patty Shepard, Maria Silva, Lone Fleming, Eugenio Martín, Jorge Grau, Helga Liné, Howard Vernon, León Klimovsky, Carlos Aured, and Vicente Aranda, among others." --Carlos Aguilar in Sex, Sadism, Spain, and Cinema: The Spanish Horror Film By Nicholas G. Schlegel


"The Spanish horror and exploitation film has from its inception been a visual art form in which Spanish filmmakers could express their own horror and frustration with the world." --Perverse Titillation: The Exploitation Cinema of Italy, Spain and France, 1960-1980 (2011) by Danny Shipka


"... Spanish cinema ignore it so completely.6 However, some of the works' perspectives offer useful ways of considering Spanish horror films of the period. For example, Marsha Kinder in her important 1993 study Blood Cinema, devotes a chapter to violence in Spanish ... new thing, that Spanish culture has a strong model for politically motivated images of violence, most significantly the paintings of Goya." --Horror International (2005), Steven Jay Schneider, ‎Tony Williams, page 166

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

This page looks for strands of horror and exploitation in Spanish fiction.

Visual art

Film

The Eurotika! documentary 'Blood and Sand' episode focuses on classic Spanish horror, which distinguished itself as gorier, grittier, and more down-to-earth than works being produced elsewhere in Europe. The Awful Dr. Orloff (1962) was the first Spanish horror film.


See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Spanish horror" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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