Spaghetti western's influence on Lee Perry  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

As Daniel & Seth Nelson first noted in the late 1990s in on-line magazine Perfect Sound Forever, during the late 1960s and early 1970s, the imagery of spaghetti westerns was of influence to Jamaican reggae musician Lee Perry.

Albums Perry recorded with The Upsetters such as Clint Eastwood, Eastwood Rides Again, The Good, The Bad & The Upsetters and song titles such as "For a Few Dollars More" and "Return of Django", all suggest western movie themes.

Most of the songs were instrumentals, the band was therefore free to name the songs and they chose to base their material on strong, cowboy heroes. Sonically too, these works hint at sounds from the Old West: cowbells mimicking horse hooves, organs imitating the "Western" music, gun shots and yelping. Visually, the covers of these albums portray people with cowboy clothes, brandishing guns, and featuring settings of desert-like area.

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