Soviet montage theory  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search
 This page Soviet montage theory is part of the film series.  Illustration: screen shot from L'Arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat
Enlarge
This page Soviet montage theory is part of the film series.
Illustration: screen shot from L'Arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Soviet montage theory is an approach to understanding and creating cinema that relies heavily upon editing (montage is French for "putting together"). Although Soviet filmmakers in the 1920s disagreed about how exactly to view montage, Sergei Eisenstein marked a note of accord in "A Dialectic Approach to Film Form" when he noted that montage is "the nerve of cinema," and that "to determine the nature of montage is to s
 This page Soviet montage theory is part of the film series.  Illustration: screen shot from L'Arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat
Enlarge
This page Soviet montage theory is part of the film series.
Illustration: screen shot from L'Arrivée d'un train en gare de La Ciotat

olve the specific problem of cinema."

While many Soviet filmmakers, such as Lev Kuleshov, Dziga Vertov, and Vsevolod Pudovkin put forth explanations of what constitutes the montage effect, Eisenstein's view that "montage is an idea that arises from the collision of independent shots" wherein "each sequential element is perceived not next to the other, but on top of the other" has become most widely accepted.

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Soviet montage theory" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools