Sorrow (emotion)  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

(Redirected from Sorrow)
Jump to: navigation, search
Illustration: Laocoön and His Sons ("Clamores horrendos" detail), photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.
Enlarge
Illustration: Laocoön and His Sons ("Clamores horrendos" detail), photo by Marie-Lan Nguyen.

Related e

Google
Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Wiki Commons
Wikiquote
Wikisource
YouTube
Shop


Featured:
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
Enlarge
Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Sorrow is an emotion, feeling, or sentiment of intense sadness, suggesting a degree of resignation.

Contents

Cult

Romanticism saw a cult of sorrow develop, reaching back to The Sorrows of Young Werther of 1774, and extending through the nineteenth century with contributions like Tennyson's In Memoriam - 'O Sorrow, wilt thou live with me/No casual mistress, but a wife' - up to W. B. Yeats in 1889, still 'of his high comrade Sorrow dreaming'.

Postponement

Julia Kristeva suggests that 'taming sorrow, not fleeing sadness at once but allowing it to settle for a while...is what one of the temporary and yet indispensable phases of analysis might be'.

Etymology

From Middle English sorow, sorwe, from Old English sorh, sorg, from Proto-Germanic *surgō (cf. West Frisian soarch, Dutch zorg, German Sorge, Danish sorg), from Proto-Indo-European *swergʰ- 'to watch over, worry' (cf. Old Irish serg 'sickness', Tocharian B sark 'id.', Lithuanian sirgti ‘to be sick’, Albanian dergjem (“I fall ill”), Sanskrit sū́rkṣati ‘he worries’ ).

In the arts

See also




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Sorrow (emotion)" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools