Solomon's Temple  

From The Art and Popular Culture Encyclopedia

Jump to: navigation, search

Related e

Wikipedia
Wiktionary
Shop


Featured:

Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel
Enlarge
Kunstformen der Natur (1904) by Ernst Haeckel

Solomon's Temple (Template:Lang-he, transliterated Beit HaMikdash, "The House of That Which is Holy"), also known as the First Temple, was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the first temple of the ancient religion of the biblical Israelites, originally constructed by King Solomon on the hill called Moriah in Jerusalem. It was designed to house the Ark of the Covenant, and to serve the Israelites (and Proselytes) as a central place where they could worship the God of Israel.

According to the Bible, it functioned as a religious focal point for worship and the sacrifices known as the korbanot in ancient Judaism. Completed in 960 BCE, it was destroyed by the Babylonians in 586 BCE. The Second Temple was subsequently built on the same site, and was destroyed in 70 CE. Jewish eschatology commonly includes the belief that a Third Temple will be built.




Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Solomon's Temple" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

Personal tools