Sex and Lucia  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Lucía y el sexo (Sex and Lucía; lit. Lucía and the Sex) is a 2001 Spanish drama film, written and directed by Julio Medem and starring Paz Vega and Tristán Ulloa.

Plot

The movie opens with Lorenzo (Ulloa) in a casual sex encounter with a woman named Elena. They part ways, expecting to never see each other again.

The next scene has Lucía (Vega) at work as a waitress, taking time off to attend to Lorenzo after a disconcerting phone call with him. Upon arriving home, Lucía looks frantically for Lorenzo, finally receiving a phone call from the police who mention that Lorenzo has been involved in a car accident. Looking for perspective, Lucía decides to travel to the mysterious island where they met.

The movie breaks to six years earlier. Lucía waits for Lorenzo at a restaurant. Upon catching his attention, she reveals curtly that since reading his book she has been shadowing him, completely obsessed and hopelessly in love. An interested Lorenzo pursues the relationship. As the past plays out, we see Lorenzo repeatedly stalling for time on his new book to his editor while Lorenzo and Lucía's relationship deepens. Lorenzo learns that he has a daughter as a result of his frivolous sexual encounter and begins to visit her at her school while meeting her babysitter Belén. Lorenzo uses his new encounters as content for his book. Lucía reads it, thinking it to be fiction.

In the present, Lucía meets a stranger Carlos and through him, Elena, who becomes her landlord. As the past is revealed the characters cope with its significance in the present.

Reaction

The film soon became an international success, winning Vega a Goya (similar to the American Oscar) for Best Female Newcomer.



Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Sex and Lucia" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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