Serbian language  

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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.
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Train wreck at Montparnasse (October 22, 1895) by Studio Lévy and Sons.

Serbian (Cyrillic: Template:Unicode, Latin: srpski, Template:IPA-sh) is a South Slavic language spoken by Serbs in Serbia, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and neighboring countries. Standard Serbian is a standardized form of the Shtokavian dialect of Serbo-Croatian. The same dialect is also the basis for the mutually intelligible standards of Croatian, Bosnian, and emerging Montenegrin.

Serbian is standardized around Šumadija-Vojvodina and Eastern Herzegovinian subdialects of Shtokavian. Apart from Shtokavian, the Torlak dialect, transitional to Macedonian in Bulgarian, is spoken in southeast Serbia. However, it does not have a literary tradition and is considered a low-prestige dialect.

Serbian is the only European language with active digraphia, using both Cyrillic and Latin alphabets. The Serbian Cyrillic alphabet was devised in 1814 by Serbian linguist Vuk Karadžić, who created the alphabet on phonemic principles. The Latin alphabet was designed by German-Croatian linguist Ljudevit Gaj in 1830 and is used by the other standard forms of Serbo-Croatian.

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Unless indicated otherwise, the text in this article is either based on Wikipedia article "Serbian language" or another language Wikipedia page thereof used under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License; or on original research by Jahsonic and friends. See Art and Popular Culture's copyright notice.

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